Philadelphia

Texting While Walking In Philadelphia Illegal for 1 day, Today not Illegal just be aware it’s about Safety Stupid.

CORRECTION: STATEMENT FROM DEPUTY MAYOR CUTLER, COMMISSIONER RAMSEY REGARDING GIVE RESPECT-GET RESPECT CAMPAIGN

STATEMENT FROM
DEPUTY MAYOR CUTLER, COMMISSIONER RAMSEY REGARDING
GIVE RESPECT-GET RESPECT CAMPAIGN

Philadelphia, July 19, 2011 – Police Commissioner Charles H. Ramsey and Deputy Mayor for Transportation and Public Utilities Rina Cutler have released the following statements regarding the “Give Respect-Get Respect” campaign. Deputy Mayor Cutler stated:

“On average, nearly 2,000 pedestrians and more than 400 cyclists are hit by cars each year in Philadelphia. That is equivalent to one pedestrian every four hours and one cyclist every day.

“The City’s ‘Give Respect-Get Respect’ campaign is an educational initiative for drivers, cyclists and pedestrians to be more aware and mindful of each other on Philadelphia’s roads. This grant funded traffic safety enforcement and educational program targets all users of our roads. Texting while walking is not illegal, but it is dangerous. We want everyone on Philadelphia’s streets to be aware of both their safety and the safety of others.

“During the campaign, the Philadelphia Police Department (PPD) is issuing warnings and citations to drivers and cyclists who have moving violations, bike on the sidewalk or use cell phone while driving. In fact, the City has warned nearly 600 bicyclists about dangerous behavior and more than 100 motorists about distracted driving. Pedestrians may be reminded to be more aware of their surroundings; however, there are no citations issued by the PPD for texting while walking. If a Philadelphia police officer observes a driver, cyclist or pedestrian participating in any kind of potentially dangerous behavior, the officer will remind them to be careful.

“It is important for all Philadelphians to be aware and respectful while using our city’s roads. Everyone should travel safely through our city.”

Police Commissioner Ramsey added, “This is a common sense public education campaign. It doesn’t matter if you’re walking, biking or driving. There are simply too many distractions that take our attention away from what is most important, staying safe and not causing harm to yourself or to others.”